JUXTAPOZ, review by Matt Gonzalez
Review: Edwige Fouvry and the Order of Things
Dolby Chadwick Gallery // June 04, 2020 - July 03, 2020
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Have you ever tried painting from memory? How did it turn out for you? Have you ever thought of a picture as a thing in and of itself rather than a memory of the image it captures? I was thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with the talented and engaging artist, Edwige Fouvry who often takes ... read more
ArtDaily
Dolby Chadwick Gallery opens an exhibition of works by Edwige Fouvry

SAN FRANCISCO, CA.- The paintings and drawings in this exhibition both continue and expand upon the visual and conceptual explorations that Fouvry has engaged in recent years. Working in an abstract style, she deftly combines line, gesture, texture, and color to create compositions that glint and fracture... read more
May 2019
Edwige Fouvry is featured in French magazine - Art and Décoration May-June 2019 issue.… read more
Edwige Fouvry's Synthetic Visions Coming to Dolby Chadwick Gallery
March 2016
At first glance, Edwige Fouvry’s paintings look like portraits and landscapes, done in an expressive manner, with a combination of intense colors influenced by contemporary trends. Visually, they do indeed fall under the category of these genres, but the way these paintings are made has very little to do with facts directly related to the visual. Instead of simply observing and imitating the images around her, the artist allows the external narrative to make an impression on her, and to shape the emotions that eventually generate these paintings.… read more
March 2014
Edwige Fouvry, a Brussels-based painter who is having her second solo exhibition at Dolby Chadwick Gallery in San Francisco, is interested in finding order and structure in chaos. Her painterly thickets, clearings and woodlands -- which sometimes include nude figures seemingly born from the painted landscape itself -- are charged by a sense of exploration and discovery. I recently interviewed Fouvry and asked her about her background, her approach and her influences.… read more

Painting people in places
March 2014
Edwige Fouvry's highly textured landscapes and portraits of nudes contain cryptic qualities that beckon the viewer to move closer and study each informative detail. Based in both reality and the ethereal, they possess figurative and abstract elements. With her current solo exhibition, "Sous le Ciel," which translates from French as "Under the Sky" and shares the name of a novel written by friend Rene Bizac, Fouvry utilizes these subjects to examine the relationship between people and their interaction with the natural world.… read more

Edwige Fouvry: "Ars Memoriae" at Dolby Chadwick Gallery
July 2012
This show, titled "Ars Memoriae," marks Edwige Fouvry's first solo show in the US. Fouvry is a French artist living in Belgium, where her work has been exhibited since 1995. Antecedents for her highly original painting, which render the human figure with discomforting intimacy, can be seen in paintings by Oskar Kokoschka, Lucien Freud and Marlene Dumas. Observation, memory and imagination interact in Fouvry's painterly response to figures and faces, and, now also to landscape. These are intimate paintings, not large in scale, and done with a fluid, elegant brush, creating a smooth texture for canvases of modulated luminous color. A blood red surrounding the eyes in the woman's head inPortrait de Nuit (2011), evokes a feeling of sorrow, if not pain. This painting, like other renditions of the human face, in Le Voeu Secret (The Secret Wish) (2011) and the tragic Seul (Alone) (2011), are mysterious images of vulnerability and endurance. They call to mind philosopher Martin Buber's famous essay "I and Thou," in which he postulated the concept of "Dialogical Encounter." In these paintings by Fouvry, we are dealing with a painter whose committed encounters with her subjects evokes in turn the viewer's resonant response.… read more
April 2012
The space surrounding the figure is rich in optical cues - deep here, shallow there, pointedly ambiguous as to scale - but refuses to locate it legibly. Both the looseness of Fouvry's brushwork and the head's disconnection from the space around it lead us to see it not merely as isolated or afloat, but as severed. The grayness of the face's complexion reinforces the repellent hint of a post-mortem view. The mind retreats to the fact that severed heads make many appearances in the history of art, frequently with biblical sources. But an echo of physical recoil persists.… read more

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